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Report: Chiefs’ proposal to change NFL overtime does not pass — but isn’t dead yet

At the league meetings in Florida, NFL owners did not vote on the proposal that was tabled in March

NFL: Houston Texans at Kansas City Chiefs Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports

According to a new report, the Kansas City Chiefs’ proposal to modify overtime rules was not approved at the NFL’s spring meetings being held in Key Biscayne, Florida.

According to Washington Post NFL reporter Mark Maske, several owners were telling him early on Wednesday morning the proposal would not pass.

Since then, NFL Network insider Ian Rapoport has reported that the proposal didn’t even go to a vote.

Back in March, the Chiefs submitted a proposal during the league meetings in Phoenix to change the overtime rules so that each team would have an opportunity to possess the ball in overtime.

By Kansas City; to amend Rule 16 to (1) allow both teams the opportunity to possess the ball at least one time in overtime, even if the first team to possess the ball in overtime scores a touchdown; (2) eliminate overtime for preseason; and (3) eliminate overtime coin toss so that winner of initial coin toss to begin game may choose whether to kick or receive, or which goal to defend.

The league tabled the original proposal until the May meetings. At the time, Chiefs owner Clark Hunt told PFT Live that the proposal might pass if it only applied to postseason games.

But according to a report from NFL.com’s Judy Battista on Thursday, the proposal considered this week was not modified, and was likely to be tabled again.

The proposal had little support at the annual meeting and it was tabled. Now it is back, although it has not been amended. Owners could change it on the floor of their meeting, but one high-ranking NFL official said Thursday night he thinks it is more likely the proposal will be tabled again.

But according to Rapoport, the proposal isn’t dead yet; a modified version (similar to what Hunt discussed in March) will be reconsidered next year.

We’ll keep you posted.