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NFL owners could decide on Chiefs’ overtime proposal this week

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After the result of the AFC title game, the Chiefs want both teams to have an opportunity to touch the football in overtime.

AFC Championship - New England Patriots v Kansas City Chiefs Photo by David Eulitt/Getty Images

The NFL’s spring owners’ meeting takes place this week from May 20-22 down in Key Biscayne, Florida, and a decision could be made regarding the Kansas City Chiefs’ proposal to change overtime rules.

Here is the rule initially proposed by the Chiefs:

By Kansas City; to amend Rule 16 to (1) allow both teams the opportunity to possess the ball at least one time in overtime, even if the first team to possess the ball in overtime scores a touchdown; (2) eliminate overtime for preseason; and (3) eliminate overtime coin toss so that winner of initial coin toss to begin game may choose whether to kick or receive, or which goal to defend.

The Chiefs lost the AFC title game, 37-31, to the New England Patriots without Patrick Mahomes touching the football in overtime last January. A decision on the Chiefs’ proposal was “tabled” at the March owners meetings, and this is the next opportunity for discussion on a potential rule change. NFL media reports that “one high-ranking NFL official said Thursday night he thinks it is more likely the proposal will be tabled again.”

The owners will also discuss whether the league’s competition committee can change the new pass interference rule without another vote of the full ownership if they think it is necessary meetings are complete. The rule approved in March allows coaches to challenge pass interference throughout the game, except for the final two minutes of each half, when stoppages will come from the booth.

The thought here comes from the idea that last year, when referees struggled with how to officiate new helmet rules during the early weeks of the NFL season, there was no mechanism in place to tweak or clarify the rules.

The league will also reportedly discuss eliminating certain drills (like the Oklahoma drill) deemed dangerous and potentially award one or more future NFL Draft locations.