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Offensive trends from the Chiefs-Raiders game

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The Chiefs are in a bad stretch of not playing complementary football. Andy Reid, Alex Smith and the rest of the offense rebounded well in Thursday night’s loss, but it was the defense’s turn to not hold up their end of the bargain. Credit the Raiders (can’t believe I’m saying this) for their offensive execution. Hopefully the few extra days allows both sides to get back on track together.

Here’s offensive trends from the Raiders game:

The First 15

The first 15 plays are scripted plays to get an idea of how teams plan to defend you. The script is followed until there’s special situations like third and short, and goal plays, etc.

The Chiefs used five personnel groups in the first 15:
11
12
13
21
22

The Chiefs motioned 8 times in the first 15 plays. Travis Kelce (4 times) was the first three motions of the game. Tyreek Hill (3 times) and Anthony Sherman (once) were the other two players to motion.

The Chiefs used 11 different formations in the first 15 plays.

The Chiefs had two tight ends or more on the field for 7/15 plays.

13/15 plays were set up from the right hash. The first two plays were the two from the left hash.

Kareem Hunt got 8 touches in the first 15 plays.

Oakland was in zone coverage all but one of the first 15. They didn’t send more than four rushers.

Chiefs Offense vs. Oakland

The most used formation this week was this look:

This is normally a three tight end formation, but Anthony Sherman had four snaps from this look as well. He motioned into the backfield three different times from this look.

The Chiefs motioned on every snap they lined up in this formation.

The Chiefs had two or more tight ends on the field for 48% of the snaps. Likely an attempt to get Oakland into base personnel.

Sherman played ten offensive snaps. The Chiefs ran on 8/10 of them. Only two plays went for less than 4 yards.

Tyreek Hill got a touch from all five offensive positions I chart (X, Y, Z, F, H). All but one of his catches came in 11 personnel. All of his touches came from different formations.

There was a shift or motion on 10 of Hunt’s first 11 touches.

The Chiefs utilized a circle motion 10 different times on Thursday. It’s a motion that you start to cross the formation and come back to the same spot (or at least the same side) that you started at. You can get people caught into checks mid-motion and alsoidentify coverage with them. The above example was on Hill’s TD catch. The Raiders were playing cover 1 with off coverage. WIlson’s short motion helped ID it.

They also used a this with Sherman who started to cross the formation and then settled into the backfield on the same side of the ball he started.

The Chiefs responded to the Pittsburgh debacle with a heavy dose of vertical concepts. I have it 13 plays. They mixed it up with some four vertical concepts, deep crosses, double moves, play action. Diverse and aggressive.

Here’s a double move by Robinson they were able to hit:

Oakland Defense vs. Chiefs

The Raiders didn’t send more than four rushers until the fourth quarter. They did it once.

They only rushed an inside linebacker twice. One was on Hill’s TD catch.

The Raiders sent less than four rushers only five times. The Chiefs gained 90 yards and a touchdown in those five plays. (Grain of salt: It was Wilson’s tip TD)

Oakland was in man coverage for only 18 percent of snaps.

The most used coverage was cover 2. A variation of it was used 50 percent of snaps.

Oakland played in their base defense for 39 percent of their snaps in response to the heavier personnel groups the Chiefs were using.

Chart Questions

If there’s something you think the charting I do might capture that you want to know, feel free to ask. I want to know what people are interested in with this.

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