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Arrowheadlines: Kansas City Chiefs News 2/3

Good morning! Here is today's Kansas City chiefs news. Enjoy!

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Kyle Rivas/Getty Images

Behind the Lens: The Top 10 Photos of 2015 - No. 9 from The Mothership

Steve Sanders comments: "It's in a short-yardage situation. We were in the red zone, and it's always a challenge to get the actual catches, especially when the distance is short. This is Harris' first touchdown, so you know you're not always keying in on him in the offense. As he came across the middle, he high-pointed the ball."

Tony Gonzalez on Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce: ‘The sky is the limit for him' from The Kansas City Star

All season long the future Hall of Famer watched a young, talented tight end thrive at the same position he played in Kansas City for 12 years.

Oh yes, Tony Gonzalez has been watching Travis Kelce. And no one was more pleased to see the 26-year-old -€” who caught 72 passes for 875 yards and five touchdowns in 2015 - receive a five-year, $46 million extension last week.

"I couldn't be happier, couldn't be happier," Gonzalez said this week at the Super Bowl. "Travis, I consider him a good friend of mine. I've watched him grow. Me and him talk a lot off the field about how his development is going."

ESPN Radio Audio: Chiefs TE Travis Kelce dishes on his new reality show, his health, his experience at the Pro Bowl, why players refuse to participate in the game and Johnny Manziel's future.

Josh Mauga interception in Oakland led to Chiefs' comeback from ESPN

Mauga's interception is No. 7 on the list of plays that defined the Chiefs' season because it was the first of the three interceptions, because his return was the longest and because Kansas City was able to tie the game as a result.

The Raiders were in field goal range at the Kansas City 33 where on second down and 10, Carr was hit by linebacker Dee Ford as he attempted a pass. Mauga had an easy interception and returned the ball 66 yards to the Oakland 2.

Dee Ford's end zone pass breakup ended string of late home losses from ESPN

The Kansas City Chiefs lost their first two home games of the season because they couldn't hold on to fourth-quarter leads. The Denver Broncos and Chicago Bears each scored two fourth-period touchdowns to beat the Chiefs at Arrowhead Stadium. Each time the winning score happened in the final minute.

The Chiefs appeared on the verge of wasting another fourth-quarter lead at Arrowhead on Dec. 13, when they played against the San Diego Chargers. The Chiefs led 10-3 late in the game but the Chargers and quarterback Philip Rivers were on the move, advancing as far as the Kansas City 1.

KC native Shane Ray, mom are grateful for Super Bowl journey from The Kansas City Star

It wasn't all that long ago, really, that Johnson was a single mom raising Shane - whose father was former Missouri defensive end Wendell Ray -€” at 54th Street and Norton Avenue in Kansas City, part of the 64130 ZIP code dubbed "The Murder Factory."

But Shane made it out there, thanks in large part to Johnson, who sent him to a private high school -€” Bishop Miege -€” by taking on extra work, and was his rock all the way and through his tenure at Missouri, where he matured into a first-round pick in 2015.

10 Heisman winners have played on a Super Bowl champion: Can Cam Newton make it 11? from The Kansas City Star

Mike Garrett, running back

Heisman: 1965 Southern California

Super Bowl IV: Kansas City Chiefs

Garrett played in the Super Bowl I loss to the Packers and returned for the Chiefs' victory over the Vikings in Super Bowl IV. He became the first Heisman winner to play in a Super Bowl and scored a "65 Toss Power Trap" touchdown made famous by coach Hank Stram and NFL Films.

2015 NFL Stadium Experience Rankings from Stadium Journey

7. Arrowhead Stadium - Home of the Kansas City Chiefs

From before you even enter the stadium, you would be hard pressed to not have a good time. Tailgating is a big deal in Kansas City. It's easy to chat up Chiefs fans as you walk through the parking lots. They are a friendly bunch of folks and don't be surprised if you are offered a beverage or some great pre-game food.

The NFL Is Screwing The World Out Of Watching The Only Known Copy Of Super Bowl I from Deadspin

Instead, they located "all 145 plays from Super Bowl I from more than a couple dozen disparate sources," remastered the footage, and stitched it together. This video footage was paired with audio from the NBC Sports radio call of the game.

Here is how the NFL explains why they had to do all this work:

Considered to be the Holy Grail of sports broadcasts, the CBS and NBC tapes of the game were either lost or recorded over and no full video version of the game has existed ... until now.

This explanation is technically true, but uses a number of weasel words to achieve that truth. There is another source of video footage, along with the original broadcast audio, of Super Bowl I. But the NFL refuses to purchase that tape, and furthermore, is doing everything in their power to make sure nobody else can purchase it either.

FREEMAN TO PLAY BERRY IN MADDEN BOWL XXII from AtlantaFalcons.com

Freeman will play S Eric Berry of the Chiefs Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 4:15 p.m. EST, streamed live on www.maddenchallenge.com or Twitch.tv/easports.

The winner of Tuesday's game will have a chance to compete in the finals on Thursday...

Lawmakers seek compensation for deceased FSU player's family from WINK News

Two Florida legislators and a group of NFL players say this is the year the Legislature should finally compensate the family of Florida State University freshman football player Devaughn Darling, who died after overexertion during a workout in 2001.

Darling's identical twin brother Devard Darling, who also played at FSU and later played professionally, appeared at a news conference in the Capitol Tuesday with two legislators sponsoring a bill that seeks $1.8 million.

State Sen. Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, and state Rep. Mia Jones, D-Jacksonville, said similar bills have been filed unsuccessfully in every legislative session for 12 years.

Crashing the Super Bowl: Tips from a legendary sneak from The San Jose Mercury News

The San Diego Chargers' season-ticket holder hobnobbed with players and coaches who frequented one of his bars, including those from visiting teams such as the Kansas City Chiefs.

When the Chiefs advanced to the inaugural Super Bowl in 1967 in Los Angeles, Rich reverted to his teenage high jinks by meeting Kansas City buses at the Memorial Coliseum and walking unnoticed into the locker room with the team.

Rich borrowed a coach's team jacket and stayed on the sideline throughout the game. He shed the jacket and walked into Green Bay's locker room when it was evident the Packers would win. That's how Rich got on the podium with Lombardi and Rozelle during the awards ceremony.

Roger Goodell's Unstoppable Football Machine from The New York Times Magazine

Certain members of the Membership are more influential than others to Goodell, though he will never admit this. Paul Allen, a Microsoft founder and the owner of the Seahawks, is almost never seen or heard from by the league. Neither is the Lions' matriarch, Martha Firestone Ford, although she did browbeat Goodell at a meeting over terrible officiating. Goodell speaks most days to the Pittsburgh Steelers' chairman, Daniel M. Rooney, the commissioner told me. Rooney, 83, is a former ambassador to Ireland and an N.F.L. elder statesman who knocked on the door of Goodell's hotel room in 2006 to tell him that he had been elected commissioner.

There is a core of men you always hear described as ‘‘key owners.'' They include heirs to old-line N.F.L. families — Art Rooney II of Pittsburgh (Daniel's son), John K. Mara of the New York Giants and Clark Hunt of the Kansas City Chiefs. Then there are (relatively) newer, more classically entrepreneurial owners — Robert McNair in Houston, Jerry Richardson in Carolina, Jerry Jones in Dallas and Robert K. Kraft in New England.

It also says something about the generational and demographic makeup of the Membership that these influential ‘‘newer'' owners are all white men in their 70s.

KMBC Video: Chiefs, Harvesters team up for 'Souper Bowl' to fight hunger

A Sixth Excerpt From the Book: "When It Was Just a Game" from The Epoch Times

A foggy Sunday morning in Long Beach greeted the Kansas City Chiefs players who stood around their bus, some hugging wives.

The Chiefs were set to go directly from their Long Beach hotel to the Coliseum.

"On the ride to Los Angeles," Hank Stram said, "the team was quiet and preoccupied. Each player was afraid of the game, of coming into the presence of greatness- the Green Bay Packers."

Hank Stram had made the point of repeating to his players: "We're playing for every player, coach, official who has ever been in the AFL. We have a strong purpose." Now he repeated that statement again.

El Niño vs. Super Bowl Defense from Wunderground

Running plays will be preferable to passing plays as it will give the offense a slight advantage. In wet conditions, offensive players can continue to run the ball, slowly grinding down the field and quickly tiring out the opposing defense.

Only two Super Bowls have ever been played in steady rain. In 1970 the Kansas City Chiefs and the Minnesota Vikings battled in 0.57 inches of New Orleans rain. The rainiest Super Bowl on record came in 2007 when 0.92 inches fell in Miami as the Indianapolis Colts played the Chicago Bears.

Mellinger Minutes: Super Bowl dumbness, Travis Kelce, Royals business and writer's block from The Kansas City Star

I sort of wish I did not feel this way, because it makes me feel like a homer, but I actually think the Chiefs will win the AFC West next season. That's a ridiculous thing to say, partly because the Broncos are in the Super Bowl, and partly because it's February, but the Chiefs were close enough this year that I think they can close the gap with some smart offseason moves and either the continued decline or replacement of Peyton Manning.

There is so much that can happen, obviously, that this is more like a verbal commitment in college football than anything that should be taken seriously.