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From the experts: Kansas City Chiefs CB Steven Nelson Q&A

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Susan Ragan-USA TODAY Sports

In an effort to get to know more about the latest additions to the Kansas City Chiefs, we are reaching out to our fellow experts within the SB Nation network to hear more about their collegiate careers. This time, we've reached out to Andy Woolridge and Chris Knotts from our Oregon State blog, Building the Dam, to hear more about the Chiefs third round selection, cornerback Steven Nelson.

A lot of what is written about Nelson points to how physical he is on defense. What insight can you lend there?

Andy: I never thought of Nelson as a really physical corner, though he never backed down from anyone, and didn't need to. His speed was his trademark from the first day he stepped on campus, but he learned how to use his body tactically to disrupt routes and create opportunities for him to get to the ball.

Chris: More than that I think his technique is his primary asset. He does not make many mistakes, and he is always in position to make a play. He can play somewhat physically, and there were a few moments where he was able to dislodge the ball and interrupt a catch. He was also a willing tackler, and if he was not able to stop the ball carrier, he was able to slow him up so somebody else could finish the play, but physicality is not his primary asset.

Is he overaggressive?

Andy: No, and he was the one rarely beaten in the Oregon St. secondary. Someone with a reputation for interceptions and breakups could be suspected of being too aggressive, but it was a combination of his speed and as he progressed an increased understanding of the subtleties of coverage that allowed him get into position to make plays, not risk taking.

Chris: I wouldn't say so, more often than not he was he in the correct position and didn't overplay his man.

What should the Chiefs not ask Nelson to do?

Andy: I would not put him on an inside receiver likely to run a lot of crossing stuff, particularly a big one, like some of the tight end-sized receivers being split out a lot. Nelson is not real big, and the beating he would take in the middle would produce some wear and tear that might slow him down too much when working on the edge guys.

Chris: The one thing that might be a little weaker might be his press coverage as he is a smaller guy, but otherwise his game is fairly well-rounded.

What do you think we'll be saying about Nelson one year from now?

Andy: That he turned out to be a better corner than what little most Rams fans had heard about him led them to expect.

Chris: Nickel cornerback for the Kansas City Chiefs. Doesn't make mistakes.