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Chiefs will take their rushing attack against Peyton Manning and the Broncos

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Answering Marshall Faulk's weekly question to us -- a great passing attack or rushing attack?

Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports

Marshall, if the question is which one I would rather have, it'd be the passing attack. Every trend suggests in today's NFL that's most important to success.

That said, an elite passing attack is not automatically better than a rushing attack. Look no further than the Chiefs beat down of the all-world Patriots for evidence of that. The Chiefs have competed with the class of the NFL in games against Denver and San Francisco too with their style of play. The common theme in the games where the Chiefs play their best is the running game. It's when Jamaal Charles is humming as Jamaal Charles always seems to do. It's Knile Davis getting more than the five or six snaps a game we've seen over the last few weeks. It's when Andy Reid isn't even tempted to pass it on third and one.

It's also what the running game affects, and that's the play action game. Alex Smith can sell a fake and put the ball in a spot the Chiefs need it. Smith plays to the strength of the Chiefs offense by moving the chains and avoiding turnovers. The rushing attack is required for the Chiefs to be successful but Smith complements that very well.

The great passing attack would be preferred. But to say the Chiefs can't win with a great running game and solid defense is craziness. The Seahawks did that just last year. And the Chiefs have played the NFL's best offense three times in the last year and in two of those games they had the ball with a chance to win with only a few minutes left. That great passing attack isn't so great that it blows the Chiefs out of the water.

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