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Why Bob Gretz is Wrong and Right about Chiefs' Stability

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"The best thing the Chiefs organization can do to stop this chain of personnel mistakes is provide some stability in the coaching ranks, so that filters down to the personnel department. It’s a waste of time for an organization to draft players that don’t match what the style of play desired by the head coach and the coaching staff. When that starts happening, then you’ve got a football operation that’s a lot like a dog chasing his own tail. Round and round they run and they never catch a title." -Bob Gretz

Totally agree. Totally disagree. Possible? Well, explain that to the tension in my head surrounding Bob Gretz's recent column about stability in the franchise.

One quick disclaimer: I really, really like Gretz's body of work. Always a great source for Chiefs news. Enough pining.

More after the jump:

I've written here before that stability is key for any organization, and that the NFL's finest franchises seem quite adept at keeping core elements in place. Other teams may raid the coffers of assistant coaches and assistant front office personnel, but that's because the product on the field is worth mimicking for a team looking at the blank slate wondering what to do. It's easy to name those franchises that dominated the last decade-plus of football - model organizations like the Steelers, Colts, Patriots, Eagles and Giants.

Gretz also correctly details the course that poorly managed teams make - that of constant turnover. Some teams, Chiefs included, have endured a dizzying number of schemes and coaches on both sides of the football in the last decade. Even the best of players can hardly succeed in such a tumultuous environment where you must relearn everything from plays to positioning. And, most of the time, it takes patience to allow the people you've first hired to allow their plan to take its true course.

Thus far, then, Gretz is dead-on... except for one key thing: the Chiefs strongest additions of this off-season are the direct opposite of his proposition.

When the dust settles on this offseason, I would contend that the best thing the Chiefs could do for their current club isn't to add any high level draft picks or sign or trade for some high profile player. Instead, the Chiefs already accomplished the greatest task set before them: namely to round out the coaching staff with the highest quality personnel. With faces like Charlie Weis and Romeo Crennel, along with the myriad of new assistants, the Chiefs seem to have put together a fine, fine semblance of coaching talent and acumen. And that has me as excited as anything else the Chiefs will do this offseason.

So while I agree with Gretz, the reality is that the Chiefs actually needed a bit more change, a bit more turnover, before they should finally let things settle. And now that the pieces are in place, I will nod along vigorously to the content of Gretz's article. Had the Chiefs stayed the same, however, this offseason would have already been horribly frustrating to begin with.